Integrated Systems and Photonics

Chip labs

Miniaturised, cost-effective measurement systems, so-called chip labs ("lab on a chip" systems), are a rapidly-developing field of research. By using microfluidic components, only small quantities of substances are required, which significantly reduces the analysis costs. Furthermore, decentralised measurement is possible, eliminating the need for dispatch to special laboratories, and minimising the analysis time. With advancing functionalisation, such "lab on a chip" systems for parallel measurements will be used on an ever-greater scale in the fields of medical engineering, environmental monitoring and drug development. Miniaturised, cost-effective measurement systems, so-called chip labs ("lab on a chip" systems), are a rapidly-developing field of research. By using microfluidic components, only small quantities of substances are required, which significantly reduces the analysis costs. Furthermore, decentralised measurement is possible, eliminating the need for dispatch to special laboratories, and minimising the analysis time. With advancing functionalisation, such "lab on a chip" systems for parallel measurements will be used on an ever-greater scale in the fields of medical engineering, environmental monitoring and drug development.


Since many measuring processes in the field of biomedical engineering are based on optical measurements such as absorption and fluorescence, integration of optical light sources and detectors with the microfluidic chip is necessary. Organic semiconductor components are particularly promising in this regard, as they can be processed in parallel  on a variety of materials, including the substrates used in the microsystems made of glass, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and other plastics.

Abbildung 1:
Figure 1: Microfluidic chip with ring channel.
Abbildung 2:
Figure 2: Microfluidic chip with blood filter and nanostructured measurement field for marker-free protein analysis.

Selected Publications

S. Jahns, S. B. Gutekunst, C. Selhuber-Unkel, Y. Nazirizadeh, M. Gerken, "Human blood microfluidic test chip for imaging, label-free biosensor", Microsyst. Technol., vol. 22, issue: 7, p: 1513-1518 (2016). 
Link: »http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00542-015-2746-6